Recent Publications

Human-Computer Interaction and Design

 

Long, K., Bakewell, L.L., McNaney, R.C., Vasileiou, K., Atkinson, M., Barreto, M., Barnett, J., Wilson, M., Lawson, S. and Vines, J., (2017). 

ACM CHI

Abstract:

"Care provision in many nations increasingly relies on the work of informal, or non-professional, carers. Often these carers experience substantial disruptions and reductions to their own sociality, weakened social support networks and, ultimately, a heightened risk of social isolation. We describe a qualitative study, comprised of interviews, design workshops and probes, that investigated the social and community support practices of carers. Our findings highlight issues related to becoming and recognising being a carer, and feelings of being ignored by, and isolated from, others. We also note the benefits that sharing between carers can bring, and routes to coping and relaxing from the burdens of care. We conclude with design considerations for facilitating new forms of digitally mediated support that connect those that care, emphasising design qualities related to transitioning, talking, belonging and escaping."

Long, K., Vines, J., Sutton, S., Brooker, P., Feltwell, T., Kirman, B., … & Lawson, S. (2017). 

ACM CHI

Abstract:

"Bots are estimated to account for well over half of all web traffic, yet they remain an understudied topic in HCI. In this paper we present the findings of an analysis of 2284 submissions across three discussion groups dedicated to the request, creation and discussion of bots on Reddit. We set out to examine the qualities and functionalities of bots and the practical and social challenges surrounding their creation and use. Our findings highlight the prevalence of misunderstandings around the capabilities of bots, misalignments in discourse between novices who request and more expert members who create them, and the prevalence of requests that are deemed to be inappropriate for the Reddit community. In discussing our findings, we suggest future directions for the design and development of tools that support more carefully guided and reflective approaches to bot development for novices, and tools to support exploring the consequences of contextually-inappropriate bot ideas."

Feltwell, T., Wood, G., Long, K., Brooker, P., Schofield, T., Petridis, I., … & Lawson, S. (2017).

ACM CHI

Abstract: 

"The recent proliferation of a reality TV genre that focusses on welfare recipients has led to concerns that prime-time media experiences are exacerbating misconceptions, and stifling critical debate, around major societal issues such as welfare reform and poverty. Motivated by arguments that 'second screening' practices offer opportunities to engage viewers with issues of political concern, we describe the design and evaluation of two smartphone apps that facilitate and promote more critical live-viewing of reality TV. Our apps, Spotting Guide and Moral Compass, encourage users to identify, categorise, tag and filter patterns and tropes within reality TV, as well as reinterpret social media posts associated with their broadcast. We show that such interactions encourage critical thinking around typical editing and production techniques and foster co-discussion and reflection amongst viewers. We discuss, more broadly, how these interactions encourage users to identify the wider consequences and framings of reality TV, and offer implications and considerations for design that provokes criticality and reflection in second screening contexts."

Long, K., & Vines, J. (2013).

ACM CHI

"In this interactivity we present Mind Pool, an exploratory Brain-Computer Interface (BCI) interactive artwork that provides real-time feedback of brain activity to those interacting with it. Brain activity is represented sonically and physically via a magnetically reactive liquid that sits in a pool in front of the participant. Mind Pool is designed to present this information ambiguously so as to encourage sustained interactions and self-reflection from participants through motivating them to relate the ambiguous feedback with their brain activity."

Long, K., & Vines, J.. (2014).

ACM Interactions - Demo Hour

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Previous Events and Activities

 

kiel.long[at]northumbria.ac.uk

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©2017 by Kiel Long